- fractional citation tool

A tool to quantify an individual's scientific research output based on citations, RCR, and the H-index divided by the number of authors in publications


As an input, it can take a list of either the PMIDs or ORCID id. Additionally, you will be asked to specify all combinations of first, middle, and last/family/surname(s) for a given author

The result is a comprehensive bibliometric analysis of the research output associated with a portfolio



Launch fCite

fCite displays (among many other pieces of information):
  • a number of summary statistics (the years since the first paper was published, the number of articles including the division into sole, first, middle, and last author papers, articles per year, and citations per year)
  • Relative Citation Ratio (a field-normalized metric that shows the scientific influence of one or more articles relative to the average NIH-funded paper; for more details, see iCite)
  • average impact of papers per year, average impact of a given paper, year scores
  • variations of above stated statistics taking into account the number of authors and their position on the author list (FLAERCR, FLAE2RCR, FLAE3RCR, ECRCR, FLAECit, FLAE2Cit, FLAE3Cit and ECCit models)
  • the ratio of author contribution vs total RCR, average number of authors, FLAE per year, etc.
  • H-index, M-index (and their fractional versions fH-index, fM-index)
For more details about the metrics see the FAQ and for the instructions on how to use fCite see Help


Reference: Kozlowski LP (2019) fCite: a fractional citation tool to quantify an individual's scientific research output. bioRxiv 771485; doi: https://doi.org/10.1101/771485

"The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal" - Aristotle
Copyright © 2018-2019 Solid Scientometrics Sp. z o.o.                                         Terms of Service                                                             Designed by Lukasz P. Kozlowski

All information that fCite provides is based on PubMed data that are within the public domain. We acknowledge the NCBI, NLM, ORCID and iCite teams.